The Impostor Adult

On this blog you will find an equal split between fandom and cute animals, with a bit of porn thrown in for good measure.

Fandoms include: Supernatural, Sleepy Hollow, Teen Wolf, Orphan Black, Sherlock, Arrow, Game of Thrones, Orange is the New Black, anything by Joss Whedon or Aaron Sorkin. I'm also a recovering ex-Glee fan who may fall off the wagon from time to time.

OTPs: Kurtofsky, Destiel, Olicity
Other Ships: Ichabbie, .Melissa McCall/Sheriff Stilinski

I live a Chris Colfer, Max Adler and Dean Winchester appreciation life.

NOTE: This is not a Klaine/CrissColfer friendly blog at ALL! Consider yourself warned.
Dylan O’Brien+puppies

Dylan O’Brien’s love of puppies is one of my life’s joys.

(via kurtofskyforlife)

jeanmarcoing:

did that fucker just jump on water is this fucking cat jesus

(via kurtofskyforlife)

The knots Supernatural has to tie itself into to simultaneously remain totally hetero, yet perpetually exclude any and all women is just…

kimbvrly:

babe

(via casfucker)

ilovechriscolferblog:

impostoradult:

deliriumbubbles:

impostoradult:

ilovechriscolferblog:

chriscolfur:

no but this is actually glee

That’s how we got Klaine. Glee ignored the general audience and listened to a small but very loud and social media savvy group of fans.

Glee’s problem was that it listened to its fans way too much. Supernatural’s problem is that it doesn’t listen to its fans AT ALL.

That is I think going to be the fundamental challenge of the industry in the era of social media. Learning to balance listening to your fans and responding to criticism, and just writing according to fandom whims which can be at times utterly WRONG or misguided. Striking a healthy middle ground I think is key.

I don’t think writing TV shows should be a democracy, nor do I believe that just because a majority of fans want something, that makes it fundamentally a good idea. (Klaine is the best possible example in the world of this. It sent Glee into the TOILET) But I also think show runners need to be open to criticism and should take fan perspectives, desires and concerns seriously, particularly when they are long-standing and widely shared. Learning to do that tightrope walk well is going to be the true test of a good show-runner going forward. 

It’s not so much that glee listens to its fans. Pezberry wins a PCA for best galpals, and they have them have a huge ugly fight and split up. Blam and Klaine don’t win and it’s shoved down our throats even harder. Kurt wins and is marginalized. They’re listening but actively choosing the opposite.

Well Glee seems to also have a strategy of throw a bunch of stuff at the wall and don’t wait to see what sticks before you throw something else at it. But i do think the show has a problem with listening to certain fans way too much about some things, Klaine in particular. There is NO WAY that shit would still be going on if it weren’t for the hysterical tin hatters of the Glee fandom. And Brittana was originally a fandom ship before they made it legit on the show, largely due to fandom pressure. Blaine gets WAY more solos than he deserves because he’s allegedly a fan favorite. So yeah, Glee doesn’t necessarily cater to everyone in their fandom, but they are definitely way too plugged into certain sections of it, and have been doing way too much fan service to those groups, to the incredible detriment of the show as a whole.

Whereas there is absolutely no segment of the Supernatural fandom that has any significant sway with the writers whatsoever. (Unless you count the anti-Destielers, and I’m not sure that’s fanservice to them so much as it is cowardice about doing a same-sex romance)

Did I read the original post wrong? I thought it was saying that to be a successful tv show the showrunners should do the opposite of what the fans want. I think has Glee has definitely done this. Rachel and Santana get an award for being best screen pals then Glee makes them enemies. Opposite of what the fans wanted. They are following the rule mentioned above. However in order to do this they ARE listening to the most obnoxious group. Making the show about Blaine is doing the opposite of what most fans want. Maybe my interpretation is wrong????

Well I’m pretty sure the tweet was originally meant sarcastically/ironically. Supernatural is notorious for not listening to its fandom about hardly anything ever, and I think this person was mocking them for that. But maybe I read it wrong! Sometimes earnestness and irony are difficult to gauge online.

yes-is-my-fucking-life-bitch:

Klaine is an unhealthy relationship and a bad example for the LGTBQ+ community and crisscolfer is not real, deal with it straight teen girls and accept the reality

(via afleshjackforblainecharitydrive)

deliriumbubbles:

impostoradult:

ilovechriscolferblog:

chriscolfur:

no but this is actually glee

That’s how we got Klaine. Glee ignored the general audience and listened to a small but very loud and social media savvy group of fans.

Glee’s problem was that it listened to its fans way too much. Supernatural’s problem is that it doesn’t listen to its fans AT ALL.

That is I think going to be the fundamental challenge of the industry in the era of social media. Learning to balance listening to your fans and responding to criticism, and just writing according to fandom whims which can be at times utterly WRONG or misguided. Striking a healthy middle ground I think is key.

I don’t think writing TV shows should be a democracy, nor do I believe that just because a majority of fans want something, that makes it fundamentally a good idea. (Klaine is the best possible example in the world of this. It sent Glee into the TOILET) But I also think show runners need to be open to criticism and should take fan perspectives, desires and concerns seriously, particularly when they are long-standing and widely shared. Learning to do that tightrope walk well is going to be the true test of a good show-runner going forward. 

It’s not so much that glee listens to its fans. Pezberry wins a PCA for best galpals, and they have them have a huge ugly fight and split up. Blam and Klaine don’t win and it’s shoved down our throats even harder. Kurt wins and is marginalized. They’re listening but actively choosing the opposite.

Well Glee seems to also have a strategy of throw a bunch of stuff at the wall and don’t wait to see what sticks before you throw something else at it. But i do think the show has a problem with listening to certain fans way too much about some things, Klaine in particular. There is NO WAY that shit would still be going on if it weren’t for the hysterical tin hatters of the Glee fandom. And Brittana was originally a fandom ship before they made it legit on the show, largely due to fandom pressure. Blaine gets WAY more solos than he deserves because he’s allegedly a fan favorite. So yeah, Glee doesn’t necessarily cater to everyone in their fandom, but they are definitely way too plugged into certain sections of it, and have been doing way too much fan service to those groups, to the incredible detriment of the show as a whole.

Whereas there is absolutely no segment of the Supernatural fandom that has any significant sway with the writers whatsoever. (Unless you count the anti-Destielers, and I’m not sure that’s fanservice to them so much as it is cowardice about doing a same-sex romance)

confusedcatsagainstfeminism:

Fight the Vacuumarchy!

Confused Cats Against Feminism is a project of We Hunted the Mammoth:The New Misogyny, tracked and mocked.

(via muffpunch)

ilovechriscolferblog:

chriscolfur:

no but this is actually glee

That’s how we got Klaine. Glee ignored the general audience and listened to a small but very loud and social media savvy group of fans.

Glee’s problem was that it listened to its fans way too much. Supernatural’s problem is that it doesn’t listen to its fans AT ALL.

That is I think going to be the fundamental challenge of the industry in the era of social media. Learning to balance listening to your fans and responding to criticism, and just writing according to fandom whims which can be at times utterly WRONG or misguided. Striking a healthy middle ground I think is key.

I don’t think writing TV shows should be a democracy, nor do I believe that just because a majority of fans want something, that makes it fundamentally a good idea. (Klaine is the best possible example in the world of this. It sent Glee into the TOILET) But I also think show runners need to be open to criticism and should take fan perspectives, desires and concerns seriously, particularly when they are long-standing and widely shared. Learning to do that tightrope walk well is going to be the true test of a good show-runner going forward.